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What's the worst Wild Game food you ever ate?

For posting wild game and fish recipes.

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Muzzle Man
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What's the worst Wild Game food you ever ate?

Postby Muzzle Man » Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:01 am

Mine was Mountain Lion Jerky.

Next was wild Boar , wild hog is good eatin but the mature boar was pretty nasty IMHO.

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Postby teacherboy » Mon Dec 17, 2007 8:38 pm

I had some bear at a wild game feed that was just awful. Poorly trimmed and poorly cooked, it wasn't the bears fault. I've had bear on two more occasions and it was fabulous.

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Postby RAF » Mon Dec 17, 2007 8:50 pm

Don't know nothin' about mountain lion or wild hogs but I know bear meat must be properly cared for from the moment it's shot. It has to be cleaned and cooled quickly and processed ASAP.
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Postby teacherboy » Mon Dec 17, 2007 10:52 pm

From what I've read mountain lion is supposed to be very good. But I'm sure it's like everything else. It needs to be properly cleaned and prepared.

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Postby Spitpatch » Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:50 am

I think I ate a cat at a restaurant once. :shock:

:oops:

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Worst wild game food

Postby beckmw » Tue Dec 18, 2007 10:31 am

Went to a wild game dinner at a local club. Stood in line 1 1/2 hrs to get my plate full. Last guy in the line said, want to try some FOX. Replied sure im game. Put a spoon full on my plate with the rest of my food. When I got to my table I had to try it first. TASTED LIKE A WET DOG SMELLS!!! YUKKK. Everthing on my plate tasted like wet dog!! Back to the line , another hour in line told the last guy I will pass on the fox this time thanks anyway.
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Postby cayuga » Tue Dec 18, 2007 11:24 am

It is all a matter of how it is cooked and personal tastes, so take no offence to what I say. For instance I had moose at a friends house that about made me sick. Yet I had moose other times that was fantastic. The same with Bison. One time it was tuff as an old shoe and the next time it was pretty good.

Pronghorn was all right, but I would not ask for seconds. It had a strange taste to it. Also I had caribou once that tasted terrible. I was later told it depends on what the animal has been eating.

The worst I ever ate was roasted raccoon. When we were kids we were camping and decided we would feed ourselves from the woods and stream. We shot a raccoon one evening. All excited, we put that on a spit, and roasted it. It was not very good I thought. Yet in the morning when I was kind of hungry, it was not all that bad...

I never ate cougar, but heard it was really good. OH ya.. Then there was the time we were kids and shot mud hen/coots/ what ever you want to call them... ducks. We cooked one of them and no of us could eat the thing.
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Postby Muzzle Man » Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:45 pm

I had BBQ made out of Ground Hog or Coon once that was good, the beer probably helped. :) Another thing I could never choke down was Mt. Oysters, I tried em all, Beef, Pork,Turkey,Lamb,Duck, yes Duck. I could never get past what they were even with a belly full of beer when I was much younger!!! None of that was wild so I'm getting off topic. .......

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Worst

Postby Buck » Tue Jan 22, 2008 5:54 am

Goose! We spent a ton buying the stuffing and fixins for the big game dinner at camp. Manit was the saturday before buck and a tradional dinner. We threw it out.....We had a bear visiting us at that time and he would n't eat it either, not a coon nor none of the varmints....It smelled great cookin'....... Ate monkey overseas it was okay, and I am not real fond of goat meat......

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Postby vabowhntr » Tue Jan 22, 2008 7:40 am

Old Sika buck from VA's Eastern shore. The tenderloins were so tough you could hardly cut them. Whatever marsh grass/shrubs they were eating gave them a very strong sage taste as well. Even the dog thought it was bad.

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Postby RAF » Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:31 pm

Now I've never tried it but many years ago I father was moose hunting and met a trapper who invited them in for a bite to eat. My dad had what they were cooking and thought it tasted like goose and almost looked like it. Said it was pretty good. Found out if was beaver.
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Postby Michigander88 » Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:36 am

COON---Went to a game supper and had some last yr, going to same supper this saturday but no coon for me

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Postby rockervillan » Mon Jun 30, 2008 5:39 pm

Had Seal at a wild game feed, was the worst thing ever

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Postby Spitpatch » Tue Jul 01, 2008 9:48 pm

Muzzle Man wrote:I had BBQ made out of Ground Hog or Coon once that was good, the beer probably helped. :) Another thing I could never choke down was Mt. Oysters, I tried em all, Beef, Pork,Turkey,Lamb,Duck, yes Duck. I could never get past what they were even with a belly full of beer when I was much younger!!! None of that was wild so I'm getting off topic. .......

Joe


Joe!!! Ya gotta cook em first :lol:

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Postby doggzoe » Wed Jul 02, 2008 3:01 am

Best BBQ Iever eat was BBQ coon sandwich! Had it at a wild game feed. Liked it so much I made it myself at home. Take a dressed coon and cut into pieces. Place into a pressure cooker with a little water or stock and cook for 30 minutes or so. Remove everything from pressure cooker and let meat cool a little. Then seperate meat from bones and place back into cooker with your favorate BBQ sauce and simmer for a short time. Place on a bun or bread and dig in.
Worst I ever eat was the first time my wife tryed to cook duck following verbal instuctions from one of her freinds. Bad instructions very bad duck. Couldn't even chew it it was so tuff. We laugh about it now but I remember few tears back then . :lol: :cry:

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Postby funman » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:38 pm

Mine was a bull while visiting in Colorado. My buddy who lived thier went to visit his freinds and they gave him some meat from a dead bull that someone hit with a car. Man we took it to his house and after about ten beers decided to make hamburgers out of it. THIS WAS THE WORST DAMN MEAT IV EVER HAD.
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Postby guitarpicva » Mon Jun 27, 2011 1:24 pm

RAF wrote:Now I've never tried it but many years ago I father was moose hunting and met a trapper who invited them in for a bite to eat. My dad had what they were cooking and thought it tasted like goose and almost looked like it. Said it was pretty good. Found out if was beaver.


Rumor is, beaver tail is a delicacy. The fellows on the Lewis and Clark expedition seemed to really love it.
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Postby Brute » Mon Jun 27, 2011 2:04 pm

Grilled goose breast, hands down ! Lab wouldn't eat it and he'll eat damned near anything.

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Postby Spitpatch » Mon Jun 27, 2011 2:45 pm

Brute! I'm with you!!
I never ate a goose that tasted even remotely good.
If someone has a good recipe, please share!

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Postby flounder » Mon Jun 27, 2011 3:33 pm

In my younger days a bunch of us guys were standing outside having a couple colt 1s and a goose ran slam dunk right into a power line and broke its neck. One of the guys plucked it and cleaned it. He cut it up into pieces, sprinkled it with shake and bake, and baked it for an hour or so. It was the worst plucking stuff I ever ate. I shudder to think what it would have tasted like had I been sober.

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Postby Batchief909 » Mon Jun 27, 2011 4:45 pm

My ex-mother-in-law fixed a goose for a Christmas gathering. Looking back on the experience,,,It was awful..

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Postby vabowhntr » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:49 am

The only thing I can do with a goose is make jerky out of the breast. That is after a couple of days in my favorite marinade.

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Postby Brute » Thu Jul 07, 2011 9:56 pm

I've heard that goose makes decent chopped BBQ in the crockpot. Someone needs to test this theory !!

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Postby Omega45 » Thu Jul 07, 2011 10:15 pm

Batchief909 wrote:My ex-mother-in-law fixed a goose for a Christmas gathering. Looking back on the experience,,,It was awful..


She probably only gave you the goose, everyone else got Turkey! :shock:

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Postby cayuga » Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:13 pm

The way I cook a goose is very simple. Here are a few things you need to understand about geese and cooking them especially.

Make sure the goose is completely thawed out before you attempt to cook it. Because a goose is fatty, if there is any frozen spots in it, this will alter the way it cooks. You have to make sure it cooks evenly.

You need either a smoker, or a very deep sided roasting pan. I use a Brinkman Smoker. In the smoker, I use apple wood. And always a water pan. The idea is you want the goose to drip away all the fat from the body cavity as possible. Plus you want even heat. A goose can take a long time in these low temperature smokers. The larger the goose the longer it takes. a 5-7 pound goose is about perfect. 8 hours is not uncommon. But rely on the thermometer. And make sure when you check foul with a meat thermometer, you never let the end of it touch bone. You can get a false reading.

In a bowl I like to pour a 1/2 cup of orange juice, zest some of the peel in there, add about a teaspoon of salt, pepper to your liking, and if you have a juicer, (My mother ) used to juice a granny smith apple and then take the pulp out of the catch cup and add that mashed apple. I have just mashed an apple. Mix all of this together. It will make kind of a liquid paste.

Now you need to take a sharp knife. I like a filet knife and make about 5 X's cut to the breast of the skin, and a couple on the back of the goose. This is to allow the fat under the skin to work out of the bird. Also, pull the legs towards you and make a cut in just the skin between the leg and the side of the goose.

Inside the body cavity of the goose, add a chunked up slice of bread. This is to absorb the goose fat. I do not eat any of the stuff inside the goose, as it is fatty. I also like to peel an orange and an apple, and separate the orange into slices and cut the apple into chunks. Add that to the bread. This will make the juices that escape the bird add a flavor.

Now you want to rub the outside of the goose with that paste mixture. Put the most of it on the breast of the goose. As you cook the goose this stuff melts and kind of drizzles the bird with the flavors. Some add honey to the paste. I wait and half way when the bird is done, I drizzle honey over the breast. This will somewhat caramelize as if cooks and makes for a glaze.

Do not over cook a goose. If you do they get tough. 165-170?s for a internal temperature is good. When you have the body temperature to that degree, remove the goose, set it on a platter, and cover it in tin foil and let it sit 15-20 minutes and stew. While it sits for that 15 minutes, all the fruit covered juices will be absorbed back in the meat.


If you are going to use a deep sided roasting pan, make sure the goose is on a rack. Treat it just like described, but when you first put that in the oven, you want a very high temperature .... like 450 degrees. Leave it in there like that for about 20 minutes. This is melting the fat from under the skin. After that 20 minutes, you can drop the temperature down to 350 or 375 and let it roast. Sometimes it is necessary to drain the goose fat off it when cooking. The honey will caramelize real nice in the oven.

Again, after it reaches temperature, remove it, and cover it in tin foil to rest. After the 20 minutes it rests, carve the breast meat. Sometimes the legs and wings can be strong tasting, but when we were kids, my Dad shot a lot of geese and we learned to eat that part of the bird. Heck.. we'd eat anything that was set on the table.

Roast goose is very good if done right. This is how I cook it. And I have eaten it and ducks for years, cooked like this.
My short-term memory is not as sharp as it used to be.

Also, my short-term memory's not as sharp as it used to be.


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