Bang Flop Boar

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Okie Hog

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Jan 22, 2008
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right under the feeder.

Was sitting in a blind about 40 yards from the feeder. A sow and boar came into the feeder. Really wanted to shoot the sow but she never give me a shot. The young boar weighed 160-175 pounds.

Rifle: 50 caliber Black Diamond
Powder: 110 grains of Black MZ
Bullet: 200 grain .40 SST in blue crush rib sabot
Primer: CCI magnum #11 cap

 

toytruck

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Good job!! Are the young boars good to eat? I have read the boars have more of a "wild" flavor much stronger than the sows. Same is true with a young buck deer vs a old buck I have eaten.
My son works out of Fort Sill. I'm still waiting on a invite to hunt these critters with him....
 

Okie Hog

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Are the young boars good to eat?
Been eating a steady diet of wild hog meat since 2000. The meat of young boars is good. The meat of older boars is also good, if sometimes tough. i seldom notice any difference between boar meat and meat from a sow; assuming that both animals were fat. The hog meat presently in our freezer came from a wild boar that weighed about 250 pounds. It's great, especially the huge chops.

Problem is that folks take information pertaining to domestic hogs and extrapolate it to wild hogs. Domestic boars are subject to having a condition called "boar taint" , where the meat tastes really bad. That comes from domestic boars lying around and getting very fat. Wild boars have a hardscrabble life and are not subject to having "boar taint".

IME: "Strong tasting" hog meat is contaminated or rotten hog meat. Hog meat spoils rather quickly in the heat and is not improved by "hanging. When the temperature is above 80 F one has about four hours to get the meat from a wild hog cooled before it begins to go bad. Some hog hunters don't have a clue: i often see hog hunters driving around with wild hogs that are not field dressed in the 100 F heat.

i've watched guys field dress and skin wild hogs, allowing the meat to be contaminated with bodily fluids and dirt from the hide.

First thing i do after killing a wild hog for meat is to hang the animal on my truck game hoist and cut the animals throat, allowing it to bleed out. Most hunters don't do that and it impacts the quality of the meat.
 

Bphunter1974

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Feb 27, 2021
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So many people have no clue about bleeding a hog or any animal for that matter. I wonder how many of the younger ones know what jowls are, or how to cut them out and cure them?
 

Docsv2pistol

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Mar 29, 2021
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So many people have no clue about bleeding a hog or any animal for that matter. I wonder how many of the younger ones know what jowls are, or how to cut them out and cure them?
Do you cure the feral hogs jowls like Italian guanciale? That's something I would really like to learn how to do.
 

Bphunter1974

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No he processes several thousand domestic hogs and cattle every year, he has an injectable brine solution we use
 

MrTom

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At one time I'd buy two hogs in the spring, and again in the fall, from a friend that raised market hogs. These pigs were in the 260-270 pound range and when I cut the animals from the available herd I'd look for animals that were tall, equal thickness thru the hams, flanks and shoulders. A .22 shot to the bean, head on, an inch above the centerline thru the eyes. Immediately they were hung by the hind leg, given a quick scrub down with dawn soap and a brush and running water, rinsed and the throat cut. I'd lay the cleaned, washed carcass on a new 8X6 plastic tarp and dress it out. Then it would go onto another tarp for the trip home with the cavity full of 5 pound bags of ice. Repeat for the second hog. They never hung at all and were processed the same day they were shot.

Like any pig, domestic or wild, they need to be cleaned well wherever an incision or cut is going to be made, hence the bath with dawn and a scrub brush. If one does not have time to process a pig of any nature immediately after killing it, he[she] should not kill the pig. Pigs do NOT get better by so called aging, just closer to spoiled with more time.
 

Smokey_GA

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May 26, 2020
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Nice! As much of a pain as they are, I wish we had them here at my place. Better yet, the neighbors place.
It can be hit or miss, I've had 250-300# boar hogs that have fat white as snow that are just as good eating as anything you ever want, I've also take a 50#boar out of the trap and tried to cook him and the smell run me out of the house.

Diet, age, body condition all factor into it. IMO less sows mean less hogs so don't bother shooting boars anyway.
 

Okie Hog

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Jan 22, 2008
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That lease is overrun with wild hogs. Whatever appears gets shot. A few nice hogs are kept by lease members or for special friends.

For years we avoided leaving hogs to the coyotes and buzzards. We made a concerted effort to give away tons of wild hogs. We field dressed and usually skinned several dozen hogs every year. Only one person ever bought corn for the feeders and traps.

Then folks got really persnickety, ordering hogs by sex and size. Some wanted the hog delivered to the butcher shop. At age 80 i said enough and my partners agreed. We field dress and skin hogs for a couple families.

There are two truths about wild hogs: No one wants a hog and everyone wants a hog.

No one wants a freshly killed whole hog.

Everyone wants a nice sow, filed dressed and skinned, delivered to the processor.

One couple gets a large hog every year. The lady is German and she makes some really good stuff. i kill a large trapped hog in their presence and they take it from there.
 

TheOutlawKid

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Apr 9, 2021
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Ya know...ive never tasted wild hog. We have javalinas in south texas...also known as peccaries. I have tastes those but don't think they taste the same. They look like pigs but are closer in relation to ant eaters etc.
 

Wedgy

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Boars have scent glands one of which is down by the belly and it stinks. I do the gutless method so I don't worry about it. I've had guys tell me that pigs eating acorns will taste good and I've had guys say exactly the opposite. I have tasted acorns and they aren't very good so I know what I think about that tale. The biggest pig I ever shot was 415lbs and he was delicious, and I've had ~90lb females that were tough and tasted horrible, not really sure what the cause is but I think it has to do with how much water the get. This is on a ranch in california.
During our 4 year drought wet sows only carries 1 or 2 piglets when normally they had 6-9 in good conditions.
Nice pig ! I have never taken one with a ML
 

Big R

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Mar 6, 2021
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I’ve got a upcoming hog hunt on a property. Was thinking about bringing my muzzleloader if I get the stock in time to finish the build.
 

Bad Karma

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Apr 28, 2020
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Boars have scent glands one of which is down by the belly and it stinks. I do the gutless method so I don't worry about it. I've had guys tell me that pigs eating acorns will taste good and I've had guys say exactly the opposite. I have tasted acorns and they aren't very good so I know what I think about that tale. The biggest pig I ever shot was 415lbs and he was delicious, and I've had ~90lb females that were tough and tasted horrible, not really sure what the cause is but I think it has to do with how much water the get. This is on a ranch in california.
During our 4 year drought wet sows only carries 1 or 2 piglets when normally they had 6-9 in good conditions.
Nice pig ! I have never taken one with a ML
I’m inclined to subscribe to your hydration theory. Domestic hogs need a lot of fresh water to gain and keep weight. So do cattle and I would guess the same goes for most things made of meat. Also, bears fattened in a good acorn year are delicious if properly cared for...
 
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