Can you feel the burn?

Discussion in 'General Topics' started by GM54-120, Aug 3, 2016.

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  1. Aug 3, 2016 #1

    GM54-120

    GM54-120

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    Orange habanero
    [​IMG]

    Lemon drop (C. Baccatum)
    [​IMG]

    Cowhorn that are supposed to be mild. It must have forgotten to read the description.
    [​IMG]

    Serranos....Not really that hot to me but....
    [​IMG]

    Super Chiles....these things grow like a weed and produce a ton of cayenne heat level pepper.
    [​IMG]

    My personal favorites are the lemon drops. I can eat them fresh without intense pain and suffering. They also produce a ton of peppers and seem easy to grow. Heat level is upper serrano+ but they are slightly sweet with a hint of citrus. Ive only gotten 2 ripe ones so far but both plants are covered in green pods and blooms. My habanero is loaded too with green pods.
     
  2. Aug 3, 2016 #2

    hawgslayer

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    :d'oh!:

    Zantac time :!: :!: :!: :puke:

    Ray............... :shock:
     
  3. Aug 3, 2016 #3

    03mossy

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    They all look delicious to me except the Habenaros. Something about those I dont like and its not the heat, its almost like they have a chemical taste to me. I may have to look into those lemon drops, they sound good!
     
  4. Aug 3, 2016 #4

    GM54-120

    GM54-120

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    If you want real lemon drops make sure its a C. Baccatum. I got mine from chileplants.com.

    This is a real lemon drop pepper. https://www.chileplants.com/search.aspx ... ode=CHILED

    Some places call a Aji Limon a lemon drop but that is a C.Chinense which is a member of the habanero family and a fair amount hotter. Not brutally hot but hotter. They look very similar. https://www.chileplants.com/search.aspx ... ode=CHILIM

    I can nibble on a fresh lemon drop easily. I like to eat them fresh with some mild salsa and chips. They also make a fantastic hot sauce. When mine turn yellow i will save some seeds. I only had 2 turn so far and i ate them. :D Might be another month though before i can send any.
     
  5. Aug 3, 2016 #5

    cayuga

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    I have friends and family that love to cook, even eat hot peppers. Now I like Green Peppers, and Yellow, Red, and Orange mild peppers. But if they are hot, they just tear my stomach up. I mean heart burn city. A sit with the Tums bottle night. But you sure grow some nice looking peppers there. Do you grow Ghost Peppers? I saw a cooking show where someone used one of them and everyone that ate his food, you could see the discomfort in their face I thought.
     
  6. Aug 4, 2016 #6

    GM54-120

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    No, i dont grow ghost or anything hotter than a habanero. I was going to grow a super mild habanero type of pepper this year but the order got messed up. They are milder than a jalapeno.
     
  7. Aug 4, 2016 #7

    SteveH

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    Got the habaneros, cerranos, jalapenos and super chilies as well. Will have to look for the Lemon Drops next year!

    Those little super chilies were the most surprising for me, crazy hot! Took a chance and picked up a four-pack of the plants and now have more of those little buggers than I know what to do with. Will likely dehydrate and grind up.
     
  8. Aug 4, 2016 #8

    GM54-120

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    My super chiles are milder than Thai peppers and about the same as the very upper end of cayenne. Last year i grew a Thai dragon chile hybrid that was WAY more painful than these.

    I pack a swing top wine bottle full of them then top off with hot vinegar. It will keep for years. Let it set for about a month before sampling. Its very tasty on cucumber and onion salad.

    The lemon drops are a MUST try. Aji pineapple are very similar. Both are easy to grow and produce tons of peppers. Aji amarillo are a tiny bit hotter but needs a long growing season. They also produce a ton of peppers. If you can start them indoors in roughly February they are a great choice too.
     
  9. Aug 8, 2016 #9

    GM54-120

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    West Indian Bhur Gherkin pickles with super chiles. Man are these fantastic pickles.

    Cold brine...The little guys on the left side are Mexican sour gherkins aka mouse melons or sanditas
    [​IMG]

    Hot brine
    [​IMG]


    And...more ripe Cowhorns and Habs.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Aug 10, 2016 #10

    GM54-120

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    Almost got enough habs now for a hot sauce. The cowhorns look so nice. Cant wait to try them in a sauce.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Aug 10, 2016 #11

    Squeeze

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    [youtube]gSzgNRzpjo8[/youtube]
     
  12. Aug 10, 2016 #12

    bacass

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    I'm really enjoying this thread! Got to get some lemon drops next year. Thanks for the link GM. and I sent the video around to some old friends too Squeeze.
    When I was working at the firehouse we always had various homemade salsas and a ton of corn tortilla chips on hand. Ghost peppers are too much I agree, and some habaneros that get "chemically" tasting.
    Roasting and cutting out seeds works well too.
    Cayuga, if you can stand building up a tolerance, they kill off harmful bacteria in the digestive tract, and eliminate esophageal reflux.
     
  13. Aug 11, 2016 #13

    JStanley

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    The capcaicin is also good for cardiac health. :yeah: I always thought that God made the habaneros look like little balls of orange flame on purpose... :shock: I usually just cook with those since they seem to be all heat and no flavor to me. Having a bumper crop of bell, banana and jalapeƱos this year - all going into salsa!
     
  14. Aug 12, 2016 #14

    GM54-120

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    Just got done chopping

    10 habs (seeds removed)
    1.5 cups of carrot
    1 large red cowhorn
    10 Yellow finger hot peppers....These are actually very mild.
    2 Lombardo pepperoncini peppers that turned red on me. (I only pickle them green, reds get soft in the brine)

    Mixed with
    1 tbs Morton's canning salt
    2 cups water for a 3.6% brine solution
    2 tbs of dbl strength rice vinegar (not really needed i just like to get the ph headed in the right direction early)
    3 tbs of homemade kraut juice to kick start the fermentation

    Its a lot less painful to freeze your peppers first and freezing help rupture cell walls which speeds things up a tad. I about died chopping the 3 fresh habs. I wore gloves and scrubbed afterwards all the way up to my elbows. :D
     
  15. Aug 15, 2016 #15

    ShawnT

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    Are you just making this for putting in the Fridge to eat right away or canning it?

    I like some heat but not a lot and this got me looking online. I was seeing several recipe's online for Pickled Jalapenos and carrots. Man that sounds good. Some of the recipes show you how to can it using a water bath canning process since they are pickled.
     
  16. Aug 15, 2016 #16

    GM54-120

    GM54-120

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    This test batch is being lacto fermented like sauerkraut. Later it will be cooked and some vinegar will be added. I don't add enough vinegar to make it shelf stable but it keeps a long time in the fridge.

    I could add more vinegar, ascorbic acid and potassium sorbate but i prefer the way it tastes after aging more in the fridge.

    When i can for short term i just pour in hot brine and tighten the lids. Make sure they seal and put in the fridge. If im going to eat them sooner i increase the vinegar ratio, pour the brine cold and put them in the fridge right away. I have a pressure cooker/canner for long term storage and shelf stable.

    Hot vinegar and the ferment.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Aug 16, 2016 #17

    ShawnT

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    Must be the year for Peppers. I spoke to my brother in Ohio over the weekend and he said him and his son both have bumper crops of Jalapenos, Banana, bell, and some others. Neither of them pickle any. :( I love Pickled Jalapenos and Banana peppers on Burgers and other Smiches. :drool: I hate to buy them as the store stuff usually has too much salt for me. :(

    When I looked online after reading your pepper/carrot recipe I saw several recipes for Mexican Spicy carrots that looked quite tasty. Might just have to make a small batch to try.
     
  18. Aug 16, 2016 #18

    GM54-120

    GM54-120

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    My Jalapenos had great flavor this year but production is very poor. Previous years it was the reverse. I had tons of bland huge jalapenos so i switched the variety to a type i knew had some kick.

    All my pickles and ferments have less salt than most commercial products. For ferments i use a starter from a previous batch of kraut. You can also buy lacto culture starters but they are crazy expensive. My hot sauces have WAY less salt but there are some commercial brands with much less than average.

    Pickled carrots and cauliflower are two of my favorites. Ive got a nice sized jar of cauliflower cold brined in the fridge right now. I like it a little spicy too. I just made up a jar of pickled Lambardo pepperoncini peppers with a cowhorm added.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Aug 16, 2016 #19

    bacass

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    Those all look tasty GM54-120, I'd like to get to your level of expertise one day. I'd also like to learn home brewing to make a beer worthy of good food as well.
     
  20. Aug 16, 2016 #20

    ShawnT

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    I do enjoy your posts like this but have to admit all the fermenting stuff does go over my head a bit. But it does give me reasons to look at these things online. I just wish I could have a garden here. I plan to try a Spicy Mexican Carrot recipe this weekend. I just might add the cauliflower to it too now that you mentioned it. :drool: Last Fall when I was back in Ohio my nephew came over the day I was leaving and handed me a couple very large plastic grocery bags of peppers. One was just stuffed with jalapenos. The other had a bunch of Marconi peppers. Never had those before, not spicy, but they had a fantastic smoky flavor. I tore those up! :D
     

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