Grey Dove mushrooms

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MrTom

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This spring I inoculated three poplar log totems with Grey Dove Oyster Mushroom spawn. The totems had to stay wrapped in heavy black plastic until just a week ago. The totems looked mushroomy the minute I got the wraps off. We've had lots of intermittent rain here since the unwrapping. Yesterday I snooped on of the totems where I wouldn't get muddy and found maybe twenty buds and inch long with sweet little caps the size of peas on them. Here thy are today.



I'll wait until Thursday to take the knife to them and we'll have them fresh for din-din.
 

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Idaholewis

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MrTom, You can eat my Portion as well :lol: I’ve grown sensitive to Mushrooms? From the time i was a little boy up until i moved 8 years ago, We picked Morel Mushrooms under Cottonwood Trees on The Wa Coast, I remember them being really good eating, but the last couple of times i had them they messed with my System, I needed to be Close to a Bathroom :lol: I haven’t bothered the Mushrooms since
 

MrTom

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It was probably slugs that crawled up into the morels and didn't get rinsed out that made you....ill.
 

BuckDoeHunter

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I love fresh mushrooms but usually only get to eat the common store bought button type. How do you prepare the ones you have?
 

MrTom

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I rinse them off and dry a little in a soft towel, then I bathe them in butter over a medium heat in a fry pan until the natural water they're full of has cooked out. I don't fry them until they are crispy, just enough to get the water cooked out of them. I fix all mushrooms this way. Right now BDHunter you should be finding the Hen/Chicks of the Woods clumps. Very, very tasty sautéed up in butter and one clump can yield enough petals/leaves for several meals. Look for them at ground level on or near mature oaks. The Hen/Chicks of the Woods eat far better than the morel.
 

Magnum

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Had my share of Hen of the Woods this year. They are yummy! I think by clarifying the butter helps keep the moisture content down while sautéing.
 

MrTom

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The mushroom logs are feeding us well right now. Oyster mushrooms and a couple nice Shitakis shown. My four totems are delivering big time and the eating has been out of sight.70006146_878726245836170_3977242086641500160_n.jpg
 

CatamountRob

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Jul 12, 2015
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I’ve never tried growing any but I spend my free time in the summer foraging for them. Chanterelles are my favorite. I forage in the same area I deer hunt so I combine mushroom picking with running trail cameras by mid summer. I don’t get grief from my wife about wasting time with cams if I also come home with a nice basket of mushrooms!
 

rangerod

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Until just about five years ago I exclusively hunted morels in the spring while also turkey hunting. Fifteen -twenty years ago I could find all I wanted on public land. Sadly those days are long gone. So I gave it up..............until I found out about chicken of the woods found in the fall. A combination of yellow and orange that grows in some kinda shelf arrangement on dead wood. It is truly delicious and very few people pick it. Also to look for hen of the woods that grows around oaks.
 

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I don’t find many morels here in Massachussetts but our late summer and fall mushrooms are often bountiful. August brings a variety of boletes, the bicolor being my favorite. September we start finding black trumpets in pickable numbers along with chanterelles. October is wonderful with Maitake, oyster, sulfur shelf. November is blewit time for us. They are a lovely sort of spicy delight, just be sure to cook completely. I left out September’s most prolific edible, Armillaria. Some folks call them stumpies and many other names. I just don’t care for them but I don’t know why. It might be the texture of the cooked caps, sort of flaccid to me. I love hunting mushrooms as much as I love deer hunting. Sometimes they are as hard to see as deer. But they can’t bound away!
 
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