Northern Virginia No difference Garden Food Plot

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Feb 3, 2021
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Opening day?
Made my day.
Started drying Roma and cherry tomatoes yesterday. They are good in bread and salads.
I also carry some in my hunting coat/ruck sack, along with dried apples and cashews.
Most folks have no idea they are dried cherry tomatoes. I grow 8-10 different kinds.
 
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Bad Karma

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Apr 28, 2020
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368
There's only two, possibly three, sure ways to stop deer from eating your garden up.

1. First is a fence a MINIMUM of 10 feet tall. Anything shorter, and a mature deer, especially one that's afraid, can scale it.

A pair of shorter fences placed 4 feet apart, with the outer fence being at least 5 feet tall, and the inner fence at least 8 feet tall, will USUALLY prevent deer from getting to your garden. Most people don't invest in the outer fence like they do with the inner fence. It usually ends up being much less substantial than the inner fence.

2. Second, is killing them. ALWAYS WORKS. NEVER FAILS.

3. Third, is a livestock guardian dog. If you have livestock to protect near the fenced in garden, then a well trained livestock guardian dog will keep the deer away. But, the dog is going to have to be specifically trained to ward off a species of animal that genetically it is not inclined to chase away. Deer are herbivores, and that's what a livestock guardian dog protects.
My Beagles were great little deer chasers... actually they chased anything with hair on it. Most wouldn’t run deer by choice while hunting because, well, muleys will lead a beagle on a merry chase for many many miles and the little dogs do seem to learn that the hard way.
 

Docsv2pistol

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Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
986
Opening day?
Made my day.
Started drying Roma and cherry tomatoes yesterday. They are good in bread and salads.
I also carry some in my hunting coat/ruck sack, along with dried apples and cashews.
Most folks have no idea they are dried cherry tomatoes. I grow 8-10 different kinds.
As a chef we used to slice grape tomatoes in half, drizzle them with really good EVOO, season them with sea salt, fresh cracked black pepper & thyme; and then oven dry them at 200°F until they had the consistency of a Gummy Bear. They were for garnish on high end salads. Most of the staff made extras because we ate them like candy.
 
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