PBR (Point Blank Range) Scope Zero

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45-70

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Jan 8, 2019
Messages
1,142
And I would add a dead center hold @ 100 might present the same challenge (less climatic conditions). Nothing replaces the actual shooting of the distances and making a slight POA change at the high/low end of two extremes.

Also those people with ballistic reticule scopes it is a very easy adjustment 'with practice and confirmation'. Still in my mind easier than dialing in adjustments while HUNTING.
explain how much easier than dialing! you still got to know range or won't work
 

southdakbearfan

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Feb 6, 2021
Messages
127
In my experience tactical/target scopes and the adjustments inherant to them work great in very controlled conditions. Target, prairie dog hunting and in certain stands where either distance is limited or has well known markers. I also have always held the thought that a scope, regardless of quality, is like any other mechanical device and every adjustment is one adjustment closer to failure for that mechanism. Of course the same could be said for every shot/recoil is one step closer to failure.

But, almost all of my hunting rifles are set up for a 6“ or 8” kill zone MPBR, depending on the game I am chasing. I am good out to 350-400 with my centerfires and I know the dope on the ballistics beyond that if needed, but for the most part it has to be absolutely perfect hunting big game for me to stretch further. My longest big game shot was a range finder verified 560 yards on an antelope with absolutely no wind with a 257AI and a 100 grain nosier ballistic tip. I knew where I had to go with the hold over, bang, antelope walked two steps and fell over dead.

Twice on elk hunts I have been camp muscle where someone had to “dope” in their 250 yard shot and things went south from ther with misses or wounded game. Most of that was on the shooter, his original sight in and ammo, but it just brings in a potential error and equipment factor I personally don’t need. Now I also know guys that can dial anything in for the situation and range and be nuts on as well but for me I can set up my scopes on big game to be where I need for any shot I am comfortable with, without needing adjustment in the field.

Muzzleloading we are required here to shoot either open sights or 1x scopes so there is no adjusting in the field for me. I am confident to 150 or so with my peep set up, but again it has to be the right conditions and rest. Mostly I muzzleloader hunt at ranges of 100 yds or less.
 

snapbang

Imlay City Michigan
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Joined
Mar 9, 2019
Messages
1,344
Its natural to always get the most out of a gun. To be able to shoot long distances. For hunting maybe we need to increase our hunting skills and get closer or in a better location. If im not in my Trump Tower and am hunting I am always studying the situation. Where is the wind? Where are the animals likely to be? Is there a good hide? Is there a place to rest my gun for the shot? Clear any debris from under my feet. Can I improve my position.

All to often I see very poor hunting skills. Slamming doors, racking gun bolts, loud talking, flashlights swinging about, sitting in the wide open, smoking, playing games on a phone, listening to music, moving around, eating something with tinfoil, candy wrappers making noise. The list goes on. I try to impress on other hunters the deer don't want to die. How would you react if you were being hunted?
 

Docsv2pistol

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Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
1,199
The thing I most appreciate about hunting, after the calm that descends over me once I am immersed in the forest, is that it taught a fairly impatient kid/young adult the importance of patience. Something that I sorely lacked until I started teaching myself to still hunt.

Without patience, there can be no successful hunting. Still hunting, or very slow stalking, requires the utmost in patience. It's my favorite way to hunt. It makes me SLOW DOWN. Something, that I have to remind myself to do every time I enter the forest/field to hunt.

Still hunting also requires that I leave all of the late-20th Century/early-21st Century fast communications technology either turned off, or not taken along with me at all.

In an ideal world, the one where I could afford anything I desired for muzzleloading hunting, I would only take afield a pair of Leica Geovid 8×56R range finding binoculars, an Iridium 9555 satellite phone, and a custom fabricated, flintlock, Rice barreled, .672 caliber Forsyth rifled, English Sporting Rifle that was equipped with both a tang-mounted ghost ring rear sight that was mated with a Blitzkrieg Components, AR-15, 8-36 threaded post, chevron front sight with white stripes & a tritium dot. Barrel would have Talley scope ring dovetail bases machined directly into the top flat of the barrel's octagonal breech. I would look for an older, 90's, Austrian/German 4x42mm fixed power scope that would be mounted in Talley, steel, Q-D lever rings.

Stock would have a 13" length of pull coupled with a Kick-eez Magnum, 1.375" thick recoil pad. GrovTec, flush mount, push button, sling swivel bases would be installed so that any type of modern shooting sling could be utilized.

Two, brass, Spartan Precision Equipment, Classic gunsmith adapters would be installed for use with any of Spartan's ultra-lightweight
bipods, tripods, quad, or quint support systems.

Such a rifle, in the hands of a competent rifleman, would be fully capable of 250 yard humane kills when using the riflescope. A 150 yard zero would probably be a good starting point, along with a 0.662" diameter ball, a 0.024" thick linen patch, and approximately 150 grains of ffg Swiss black powder.
 

BryanH

Active Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
32
I’ve always used point blank range to zero my optics. The only problem I see with it, is most of us don’t necessarily take the capabilities of that gun to shoot groups.

For a 3 moa deer rifle, that means you zero for no more than 1” high and use a max range of no more than maybe a half inch low so you can hit that 8” target with certainty. You might have 12” to play with on a perfect broadside shot but we generally assume about an 8” kill zone.

If you can learn to hold al title high or low and still hit that, then it’s all you do what you want.

But this probably makes a lot of guns 100 yard hunting rifles
 

BryanH

Active Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
32
one exception I make to my post above is for squirrel rifles. I like them dialed in so the trajectory does not rise above point of aim not even a 1/4 inch. Because on a steep angle shot up into the trees I can still be hitting an inch or so high. And I like to hit them in the head/neck if possible.
 
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