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Cent540

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
100
I have a .50 caliber Knight MK85. I shoot two pellets (100 grains) and a saboted bullet and it's a bear! I mean, my son doesn't even like to shoot it. I also have an original 1861 .58 caliber I shoot 60 grains of FFG and either a patched round ball or minies. Way way nicer to shoot. All day fun.
 

oldfrank

New Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2020
Messages
3
1596205660944.pngNot for a range session, but I love these for hunting. I use them for traditional and inline. They hold a sabot or bullet, loose powder or pellets.
 

Bruce Mattes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
607
At 66, and just now getting back into m-l after a near 26 year absence, I am NOT the man I used to be physically.

With pretty decent osteoarthritis in both shoulders, and a PCP recommending me to NOT to subject my arthritic shoulders to long arms recoil, I have had difficult decisions to make.

My first decision was to take an Optima V2 pistol, have DOC White Javelina-style pistol-grip stocks & a MZ REX 2 muzzle brake installed. With a single -point sling, and flush-mounted push button sling swivels, this pistol set-up will allow me to plink, target shoot, practice, or hunt without subjecting my shoulders to any more stress than necessary.

However, a HUGE PART OF ME still wants to shoot a muzzleloading long arm, preferably a flintlock. Because, that is what I started out with, and it's where my m-l heart lies.

There are a lot of factors that will play into my choice of a long arm, should I decide to take the risk.

What animals will I hunt? Will I be able to still hunt? Can I successfully get within 25-40 yards, on a consistent basis? What are the minimum legal requirements for the animals I wish to hunt? How much power DOES IT REALLY REQUIRE to kill a black bear, feral hog, or whitetail deer? If I decide to include turkey hunting in the mix, what are my states minimum legal requirements for such?

Since I am now 66, and I wish to shoot/hunt until GOD says it is time to stop, my weapon of choice is going to HAVE TO BE MUCH LIGHTER, than when I was a younger man.

Because of economics, I will in all like likelihood forego my fesire for a flintlock smoothbore, and instead settle for the Woodman Arms Patriot with a smoothbore, 28" long, 20 gauge barrel who's bore measures 0.620" in diameter.

Shooting a 340.26 grain pure lead ball, measuring 0.610" in diameter, the 20 bore Woodman Arms Patriot will have plenty of power for the big game mentioned above.

With traditional shot loads in either lead, or bismuth, it will be capable for small game hunting. With mylar-wrapped, plastic wads, and sphero-tungsten shot, it will be capable of medium-range waterfowl hunting.

With a Kick-eez Magnum recoil pad installed on the buttstock, and my wearing an ambidextrous shooting vest with pockets for foam, recoil-absorbing pads on both shoulders; I will be able to alternate shoulders, thus minimizing the potential for damage to any one shoulder.

NOW, ALL I HAVE TO DECIDE IS IF IT IS WORTH THE RISK!
 

Bruce Mattes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
607
Per containers for powder I went with lab-grade glass vials from....

www.discountvials.com

I purchased the 4 dram vials.....

21mm × 70mm
0.86" × 2.75"

Roughly the same size as an AA battery

4 drams
0.5 oz.
15ml
109.375 grains

25ct/$13.29
144ct/$59.09
240ct/$97.97

REAL NICE company to deal with. American-made. VERY well packed. Shipped quickly. When I ordered the wrong size vials, they were quick to remedy my mistake, with NO hassles.

The 4 dram vial is a perfect fit into a MTM, S25-12M-41, Smoke color, 25-round shotshell case. This is the 10ga/12ga ×3.5" case.

I purchased 144 vials, and 6 of the shotshell cases to hold them. At some point in the future, I will purchase additional vials.
 

Cent540

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
100
At 66, and just now getting back into m-l after a near 26 year absence, I am NOT the man I used to be physically.

With pretty decent osteoarthritis in both shoulders, and a PCP recommending me to NOT to subject my arthritic shoulders to long arms recoil, I have had difficult decisions to make.

My first decision was to take an Optima V2 pistol, have DOC White Javelina-style pistol-grip stocks & a MZ REX 2 muzzle brake installed. With a single -point sling, and flush-mounted push button sling swivels, this pistol set-up will allow me to plink, target shoot, practice, or hunt without subjecting my shoulders to any more stress than necessary.

However, a HUGE PART OF ME still wants to shoot a muzzleloading long arm, preferably a flintlock. Because, that is what I started out with, and it's where my m-l heart lies.

There are a lot of factors that will play into my choice of a long arm, should I decide to take the risk.

What animals will I hunt? Will I be able to still hunt? Can I successfully get within 25-40 yards, on a consistent basis? What are the minimum legal requirements for the animals I wish to hunt? How much power DOES IT REALLY REQUIRE to kill a black bear, feral hog, or whitetail deer? If I decide to include turkey hunting in the mix, what are my states minimum legal requirements for such?

Since I am now 66, and I wish to shoot/hunt until GOD says it is time to stop, my weapon of choice is going to HAVE TO BE MUCH LIGHTER, than when I was a younger man.

Because of economics, I will in all like likelihood forego my fesire for a flintlock smoothbore, and instead settle for the Woodman Arms Patriot with a smoothbore, 28" long, 20 gauge barrel who's bore measures 0.620" in diameter.

Shooting a 340.26 grain pure lead ball, measuring 0.610" in diameter, the 20 bore Woodman Arms Patriot will have plenty of power for the big game mentioned above.

With traditional shot loads in either lead, or bismuth, it will be capable for small game hunting. With mylar-wrapped, plastic wads, and sphero-tungsten shot, it will be capable of medium-range waterfowl hunting.

With a Kick-eez Magnum recoil pad installed on the buttstock, and my wearing an ambidextrous shooting vest with pockets for foam, recoil-absorbing pads on both shoulders; I will be able to alternate shoulders, thus minimizing the potential for damage to any one shoulder.

NOW, ALL I HAVE TO DECIDE IS IF IT IS WORTH THE RISK!
I'm in the same boat brother. I'm 62, all kinds of crap hurts. Comes from living life to the fullest, lol. I got crashed up a while back and spent a couple years getting everything working again. Doc says arthritis, get used to it. I still love to shoot. I used to hunt but honestly, I like shooting more then I like hunting. My knees are done anyway. If I can get a few rounds on the paper with a big smelly, smokey, noisy antique, I'm really really happy. I had a young couple come over to me and asked me if I "could really hit the 100 yard target with that thing?" I said oh yeh, I can shoot groups with it! They told me every time I looked through the spotting scope, I got a big smile on my face I didn't know that, but it made me realize what I really like.KIMG0595.JPG
Oh yeh, I can hit it!
Neil
 

wmdbowman

Supporter
Supporter
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
197
Lot's of good comments on this thread about recoil the nemesis of flinching. The big compromise is the wht. of the gun, the more weight the less recoil, What a drag, no way around it.
I to feel my age and will not shoot guns as I have in the past. 10 bores, 8 bores or some of the African dangerous game guns. No point in detaching one of my 72 year old retinas.
For you younger guys hang in there it's coming, there is something to the old saying growing old gracefully. By all means don't sell your guns!Jimmer thanks for the turn on, I never thought about putting my bullets in a loading tube. Going to that from now on.
I also agree with a grain or 2 not making a difference one way or the other, except I do way my smokeless powder for both Smokeless ML's
and cartridges.
 

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