safety harnesses

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shrimpy50

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Jul 8, 2009
Messages
101
what are the options for a good harness that does not get in your way? i shoot right handed, and any shots too far right are obstrucred by my old K mart special two strap harness
 

marshall9779

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Joined
Aug 28, 2008
Messages
100
I also use a HSS harness. One way to get around the tether getting in the way is to try and position your stand where your main shooting lane is on the bow hand side of the stand. This will limit the shot opportunity on the draw hand side of the tree where it would interfere.
 

Barry

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Joined
Dec 4, 2009
Messages
61
I used the HSS vest this season. A welcome break from the tangled alternatives.
 

marshall9779

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Aug 28, 2008
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100
A way that I have found to get around the tether from any harness to the tree is to have the stand rotated to the draw hand side of where your main shooting lane is. I normally have it about 45 degrees the right, since I'm right handed, of my shooting lanes. You'll still alway have to contend with the strap if a deer comes in on the draw hand side of the tree, but you can position for what you expent to happen.
 

wayles

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Joined
Jun 20, 2006
Messages
504
harness

Just don't leave home without it! I am aware of way too many guys that have taken a fall, some fatal. Worse yet they were paralyzed. Can't even imagine being like that. It would be a heart breaker. The worst offender were the permanent stands that rotted and guys still tryed to use them. I think back to my youth before hangons standing on a limb balancing while shootin the recurve. I was lucky!
Wayles
 

Lbtresident

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Joined
May 5, 2020
Messages
39
harness

Just don't leave home without it! I am aware of way too many guys that have taken a fall, some fatal. Worse yet they were paralyzed. Can't even imagine being like that. It would be a heart breaker. The worst offender were the permanent stands that rotted and guys still tryed to use them. I think back to my youth before hangons standing on a limb balancing while shootin the recurve. I was lucky!
Wayles
Myself, and what about dosing off, done my share. Older now, no deer is worth the safety risks. Be safe, that deer will come out again.
 

Bruce Mattes

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Feb 15, 2020
Messages
378
When I rock climbed, all of the lower body, as well as the full body harnesses had the ability to be attached to the rock face from behind. This was in addition to the normal carabiner attachment loops in the front of the harness.

The rear loops were for long term static deployments such as belaying for a long period of time, or spending the night bivouaced on a rock wall.

I would think that a hunting harness would have the same provisions? I have never hunted from a tree stand, so I have never used a harness while hunting.
 

ENCORE50A

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Joined
Dec 4, 2009
Messages
4,009
Won't go off the ground without one. Never had one get in the way and I'm right handed, rather with the compound, crossbow, or muzzleloader.

 

Far Sighted

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Joined
Nov 22, 2018
Messages
143
I use a Big Game tree climbing harness to prevent accidents. Not much hassle for the benefit.

I had a life threading hunting event that changed my opinion about safety harnesses.

On one hunting trip I was up an oak tree about 24'. I had been up and down this particular tree several times since I first attached the climber. On this particular day when I descended about two clicks I heard a click from a safety pin releasing. I felt the climber base give away and fall. At the same moment I grabbed the the seat frame to stop my fall. I was hanging by hands about 18-20 feet high.

The climber base was attached to the containment rope. I put my feet on it to help hold me up. I struggled but finally pulled up into the climber seat.
I thought for several minutes about what to do to get of the jam. At that time poor reception on a cell phone made that option useless. I thought about using the utility rope to lower myself but I wasn't sure it would support my weight how it was attached to the climber. I decided the hanging base was in the way and cut it loose.

Finally I decided to position myself in the seat facing the tree to determine if I work down from that position. When I turned which a was dangerous action itself I found I could use my legs to hug the tree then push the cable down the tree with one hand. I continued doing this bear hug style until I may it to the ground.

Not sure how the clasp of the safety pull pin became dislodged so I check mind each time before use to makes sure they are in the correct locked position.

Lesson learned use a safety harness. And if possible use a lifeline. Now I use both. When I hunt in my lockon which is located in a larger white oak I use the lifeline. The climb up to it is especially dangerous on wet days because of slippery conditions on climbs and step pegs.

Have a great hunt that is a safe hunt!
 

Boreal

Active Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
Messages
37
I use a Summit seat-o'-the-pants harness and a lifeline on all my stands. No problems with clearance ever.
 

Bruce Mattes

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Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
378
Practice with whatever harness or safety gear that you are going to hunt with.

Do it in the off season close to home in the same clothes that you will hunt in.

Do it until the using of it becomes second nature.

Safety gear that is unfamiliar to the hunter is just as dangerous as no gear at all. Perhaps more so!!!!

It took me 2-3 weeks of 5-8 hour days before the knots and safety procedures started to become instinctual when I first started rock climbing while in the military.

And, we always double checked one another's knots.
 
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mikewalsh1

New Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
4
Just be sure to use one! Worked with a friend several years ago who most likely went to sleep and fell out of a ladder stand. He was dead at the base when found later that night. He had broken his neck and the stand was only about twelve feet.
 

BadgerRidge

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Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
49
Always wear one. Never had an issue with it interfering. Older one was a vest with pockets. New one is just the harness. I buy over coats made for harnesses (slit in mid back for the arresting strap to fit through). On top of safety they are nice to drag kills with.
 

Squint

Squint
Supporter
Joined
Feb 4, 2020
Messages
34
I used to use a harness called Big Game, but to tell you the truth since I turned 70 (77 now) I've been keeping my feet on the ground.
This is kind of the same page, when I turned 79 I quit taking the tree stand and went to a ground blind instead. Common sense finally caught up with me. I had always used ladder stands, though difficult to put up, always seemed safer. Now none of them seem safe.
Squint
 

toytruck

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Joined
May 22, 2005
Messages
2,550
I have killed way more deer on the ground than I did in a tree stand. Broke my left ankle when fell out of one in 1993 still have metal plate with eight screws for life, sold it, never up a tree since!
 

Leigh Clambakes

Active Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2018
Messages
37
I use a harness that has a manually controlled descent mechanism, one I can repack. I forget the name, CPS 1 or some such. Haven't needed it yet, but I check it prior to the first hunt.
Also I've found having the safety lanyard above you helps keep it out of the way. The attachment locking carabiner hangs just about behind my head.
My feet don't leave the ground without a safety line attached. I do a good bit of work aloft for my day job. I'm fortunate my employer is serious about fall protection, so I've had some good training, free to me.
 

Renegadehunter

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Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Messages
137
I would like to get an HSS vest, but currently just using the harness that came with my stand. It is very similar to the cheaper workplace type fall protection harnesses, except it has coatings on the metal so it doesn't make noise when I climb or move around.
I have one of the life line ropes that attaches to the tree above the stand and goes clear to the ground. The bottom end is tied at the bottom of the tree, leaving a bit of slack. The lifeline has a prusik knot, so I can attach while on the ground and then slide it up the lifeline as I climb. I get 100% fall protection from this. Most falls happen getting into or out of the stand, not when already in it.
When sitting in the stand I adjust the prusik knot up as high as I can and can still sit with a slight amount of slack in it (you want it as high as possible anyway so there is as little free fall as possible before it starts to arrest a fall). I like to stand for a shot, and haven't found that the strap gets in my way adjusted like this, except for extreme right side shots (right handed shooter), my drawing elbow will contact it if it is pulled taunt.
I think adjusting the stand to favor a left side shot (or right if left handed) is probably the best solution.
 
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