Shooting form question?

Discussion in 'Inline Muzzleloading' started by LittleGump72, Oct 22, 2019.

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  1. Oct 22, 2019 #1

    LittleGump72

    LittleGump72

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    New guy here.

    Question is when shooting for groups do
    you hold the forearm snug or just let it rest
    in a sandbag or cushion?
    The reason I ask is because this one thing
    I really never gave much thought to and
    therefore I think I may not be very consistent
    at.

    Thanks for any replies.
     
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  2. Oct 22, 2019 #2

    michiganmuzzy

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    When bench shooting i have my left hand tucked out of the way not holding the fore arm. Usually holding the bag under the butt stock
     
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  3. Oct 22, 2019 #3

    ENCORE50A

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    I leave the forearm alone in the rest and tuck my free hand. Shooting for the tiniest groups possible, if you hold the forearm with shot 1, how do you know you're holding it the same way with shots 2+? Try to eliminate any contributing factors you can.
     
  4. Oct 22, 2019 #4

    dbowling

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    I hold the forearm like when I'm hunting because that's usually what I'm shooting groups for to zero for hunting.Grip forearm lightly but firmly if that makes sense. I practice a lot and hunt with springer air rifles, they will teach you good grip/trigger control, if you dont do it the same with a magnum springer every time your groups will look pretty bad..really need good form when head shooting squirrels with them offhand also.
     
  5. Oct 22, 2019 #5

    Far Sighted

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    Be careful around the barrel to avoid applying any pressure. Light consistent pressure on forearm should do well if you repeat this. Remember to squeeze the trigger by pulling it straight back then follow thru until the shot is finished. Using bags or lead sled will help you repeat or determine if it is the weapon or the shooter
     
  6. Oct 22, 2019 #6

    michiganmuzzy

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    I stopped shooting with a springer and got a pcp, i may start shooting it again for those reasons. I couldn't get good groups. I can practice in my yard instead of going to the range.
     
  7. Oct 22, 2019 #7

    MMDC

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    Believe it depends on what you mean by shooting for a group. As replies indicate generally no contact for bench rest type shooting and light forearm contact for hunting style shooting.
     
  8. Oct 22, 2019 #8

    michiganmuzzy

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    If there was an economical way to practice shooting will your hearts pounding and your breathing hard but trying not to move a muscle but you know the target will hide if it knows your right there! Oh crap, oh crap, one more step! I can't hold still... He sees me...
    I would practice that way, for sure.
     
  9. Oct 22, 2019 #9

    Chris W.

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    I pretty much do the same. I have the forearm just resting on the bag.
     
  10. Oct 22, 2019 #10

    TR1Hemi

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    Any of you who zero your gun without holding the forearm like you would hunting, ever miss low? There is a reason for that. It is a HUGE deal when shotgun slug hunting.
     
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  11. Oct 22, 2019 #11

    45-70

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    nope never did, only thing is recoil that would change it
     
  12. Oct 22, 2019 #12

    ENCORE50A

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    No. Not at all.
     
  13. Oct 22, 2019 #13

    Chris W.

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    If my hunting shots are hitting low, it's not enough to notice or matter. Haven't lost a animal to a bad shot in a long time.
     
  14. Oct 22, 2019 #14

    LittleGump72

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    Thanks for the replies everyone.

    I have been lurking here for a couple of years
    and have learned a lot. I really enjoy all the
    wisdom everyone shares.

    You probably won't hear much from me because dad always said keep your mouth shut and listen and you might learn something. Lol!

    Keep sharing the wisdom.
     
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  15. Oct 23, 2019 #15

    deerlessbob

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    I think it’s a personal kind of thing in finding out what you’re most comfortable with and, if your long term goal involves hunting, practice like you’re going to shoot an animal. In my case, I always shoot at deer with a rest, whether it’s a shooting house window, a tree, off my knee, etc. and when I pull the trigger in one of those situations, my off hand will be holding the forearm. Consequently, at the range, I do use a sandbag, but only as a rest for my hand. I guess I’d practice differently if I was shooting only for a group.
     
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  16. Oct 23, 2019 #16

    gle3105

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    As the initial question asked "shooting for groups".
    Lot's of good techniques written above.
    I have found most of the time the gun or gun/rest combo will tell you what is needed.
    Shooting a rifled shotgun? You'd better hold the forearm down.
    Beaver forearm bench gun?
    Hardly or better not touch anything.

    I just recently rebarreled two 7mm mags.
    Same barrel weight being a light sporter.
    Fully bedded.Same loads etc.
    One grouped using no forearm touch and the other had to use some forearm pressure.

    As far as hunting or afield? I would want the most accurate loads first to see what load combinations the piece shoots best. Whatever it takes to find that load and “touch” .... use it.
    I pay most attention in how a gun recoils. Does it recoil and tilt left or right? Twist?
    Then adjust until a recoil that is straight back and straight up vertical.

    My 2 cts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2019
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  17. Oct 24, 2019 #17

    jims

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    I hold the forearm like I would when actually hunting. I believe that may not be as accurate as not holding the forearm when bench shooting but I am trying to duplicate what it will do in actual field use. Each has their own thoughts.
     
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  18. Oct 24, 2019 #18

    LittleGump72

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    I am basically looking for the best technique to develop an accurate load to be used for hunting.

    My thought has always been, the tighter the groups are from the bench the more room I have for error in a hunting situation.

    It seems that there are different opinions on what to do and that maybe you should let your rifle help in making that decision.
     
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  19. Oct 24, 2019 #19

    Dougs136Schwartz

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    Little hump

    You are correct your most accurate load from the bench will also be your most accurate hunting load.

    As far as shooting form . I have found there are several different ways to skin a cat . Not necessarily is one shooting form more accurate than the next The shooting form that fits your style of hunting is the form you should incorporate.

    The very most important factor is to be able to repeat your shooting form . I have a good friend that has a totally different shooting form than my own . Scott pulls his guns in tight ( hard hold ) and pushes his body forward . Whether he is shooting from a rest , sand bag or bipods .

    Myself I have more of a loose hold ( free recoil) I try not to manipulate the gun as much lean forward and absorb the recoil .

    Both forms work very well . You just need to find what form works the best for you .
     
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  20. Oct 24, 2019 #20

    GM54-120

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    I develop the load i want to use from a very solid rest or sled first. NO WEIGHT ON THE SLED and allow it to move back as much as possible.

    After im happy with that load i try it again as close to my hunting situation as i can mimic. Such as off a rolled up jacket or supported by a 2x4 rail of some kind with more forearm hand use than on the solid benchrest. Works well for me but im almost never shooting past 150 when hunting.

    Hard kickers i hold against me tighter and mild ones are far more relaxed hold.
     
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