Shot the Optima pistol today!

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Docsv2pistol

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Feb 15, 2020
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Last word on the subject. When I get the pistol from Doc White, and start shooting it, I only intend to have a handful of different loads for it.

Patched ball, 0.495" diameter ball load.
Hornady PA Conical, 240 grain load.
Hornady Great Plains, 385 grain load.
Accurate Molds #51-385I load.
.400" bullets in .50 caliber sabot loads.
.451"-452" bullets in .50 caliber sabot loads.

After spending the first 6 months to a year working up those loads, all I intend to do is stump shoot. I'll have a rangefinder on my person, but the object will be to relearn how to judge distance. I expect to do the vast majority of the stump shooting with home cast lead balls, and Goex black powder purchased in bulk.

I'll practice at distances out to a 100 yards, but I have set a personal limit of 50 yards for hunting.
 

MrTom

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Dec 7, 2016
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2,195
Deermanok 's last post sums it up nicely with his comment that the way the gun is loaded is not a one and done deal. Not everyone's hands are going to fit any pistol perfectly and loaded to the max with a heavy bullet will certainly deliver some heavy recoil. Personally when I shot the heaviest loads I had no intention of ever hunting them but wanted to see what the gun did with them.....I do not blame the grips for the bruising. I blame the heavy load and heavy bullets. If CVA changed the grips to suit a few then equally as many would find then uncomfortable after the change. Why does one find so many after-market grips for popular handguns? Simple. Not one grip will satisfy the masses who own the guns. Grip makers are the ones missing the boat here, not CVA.

I shoot my pistol often, as in every time I hit the range. I shoot at least ten, often 20, rounds thru it on each occasion. I shoot 240 grain, .44 cal XTPs for the range work and casual slinging at the cabin in front of a 63 weighed grain charge of BH209 and in a green crush rib sabot. I shoot the identical load except a .44 cal 225 grain XPB Barnes bullet while hunting and shoot each to the identical point of aim at 50 yards. I don't fart around changing to round balls or lead bullets simply because they are not going to shoot where the bullets I currently use will shoot to. XTP's are cheap, sabots are cheap and I want to stay as consistent as I can stay. That's why I bought the guns....they are super consistent. I'll note here that I do shoot T7 3f at the same charge of 90 grains, only by volume, with the same level of accuracy at 50 yards IF I cannot round up the BH209, but I have plenty of 209 and haven't really felt the need to go to the T7. Both bullets, both powders are as consistent as one can get and make the most use out of the gun.
 

dbowling

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Nov 5, 2005
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2,936
Im not a big guy as far as hand size or height,5`9 and 245#. When it comes to shooting pistols Im not recoil shy at all,but the Optima pistol just ate my hands up due to stippling on grip, ears on grip by trigger guard and just bad design. I can shoot heavier loads in my homemade pistols due to the fact that the grips allow the guns to recoil up and over the hand instead of directly into the palm if that makes sense.
If I could of found aftermarket grips for the Optima I would still have it, it was a hunting pistol and should handle stouter loads w/o punishing your hand..if you want to hunt bear or other large game should you be limited to 70 gr loads?
 
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MrTom

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Dec 7, 2016
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2,195
One has to keep in mind that there's a huge difference between working off the bench where several shots are probably taken as opposed to in the field hunting where its one shot. Its the several repeat shots that get the hands. Maybe every 4th trip to the club I shoot 5 300 grain XTPs just to keep in touch with where they are hitting the paper. I didn't dink around with the bear lottery this year but if I can grab an over the counter tag from the surplus tags available in the zone where the cabin is at I will hunt bruno with the pistol this fall and the 300 grain pills will be in the gun. Even a very large bear will not need more than a 300.
 

deermanok

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Jan 29, 2020
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Don't think I mentioned that before I got the carbine stock, I started to wear a light weight leather shooting glove which helped a lot.
Like Mr. Tom just said, when hunting, you're probably only going get one shot anyway. Plus the weather during deer season is typically chilly and you would most likely be wearing gloves.
 

eekjellander

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Feb 13, 2020
Messages
682
Don't think I mentioned that before I got the carbine stock, I started to wear a light weight leather shooting glove which helped a lot.
Like Mr. Tom just said, when hunting, you're probably only going get one shot anyway. Plus the weather during deer season is typically chilly and you would most likely be wearing gloves.
Most likely (HOW EVER) you want confidence you will not get it on a one shot deal ! You practice (train )with what you carry . Thats true in self protection (OR) hunting ,surprises get you or the critter grief or not if you choose to be as proficient as possible being comfortable and confident and that comes with practice . My carry gun uses the same load for practice as I will need that one time it is needed ,same for hunting as they "re both critical when needed/Ed
 

deermanok

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I couldn't agree more. I'm also and foremost a bow hunter. Have been for close to 50 years. Even though I have switched to the crossbow, I still have to shoot it to keep sharp.
I was just trying to say that wearing gloves helps the hands while shooting the pistol.
 
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