Which scale for weighing powder?

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Rockman

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Nov 23, 2019
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I need a recommendation, or two, as to which scale to get for weighing powder. I plan on using BH209, and currently have a TC volume powder measure, but measuring by weight looks like the way to go for consistency. Incidentally, I do not reload for anything else right now, so no scale on hand.
 

Sideshow

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Oct 14, 2019
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I need a recommendation, or two, as to which scale to get for weighing powder. I plan on using BH209, and currently have a TC volume powder measure, but measuring by weight looks like the way to go for consistency. Incidentally, I do not reload for anything else right now, so no scale on hand.
Well if you want accuracy get a mechanical beam with a set of standards to occasionally ckeck accuracy . No electronics can equal these . Mine is a rcbs . I have a electronic scale for quick , fast paced chores but for acccuracy -- mechanical .
 

Widude

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Yes, an RCBS 505 beam scale is inexpensive, & works. There is no real need for electronics. With reloaders moving to fancier scales, a slightly used 505 scale should be easy to find.
 

MSalyards

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Apr 21, 2018
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I use a Pact electronic scale. They built the RCBS for them till the Chinese took over. Made in the USA (Texas). I also use a 1010 Rcbs.
 

Idaholewis

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I use both, a Small compact Digital, and my RCBS 10-10 Beam. The Little digital has NEVER Failed me, But i Also double check, along with using certified Check Weigts after every few Charges to make sure they are Running True. The best, and most Fail proof way is a Quality Beam Scale. Digital Scales have ALWAYS made me Edgy/nervous, After all, they are Electronic, and Electronic stuff can FAIL without Warning, This is why i keep Certified Check weights with my Digital, and when using the Digital i use the Certified check weights OFTEN
 

GM54-120

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I use a RCBS Chargemaster 1500 Combo i got years ago. Works great for BH209. Calibrate it every time you use it. Takes a minute or two.

Another option is the volume types like the Redding 3BR or Lyman #55. You still need a scale to set it but after that its super fast to drop some charges. I think Harrells offers one that is higher end too.
 

ronlaughlin

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Used a balance beam scale since the 1950's. Worked good. A few years ago did an experiment on vent liners, and needed a scale that could weigh more than the scale then being used. Purchased a digital scale. It worked good. Kept using the digital scale for a while, and got used to it.

Switched back to the beam scale, after using the digital for a year or so; that didn't last long. After the simplicity of the digital scale, using the beam scale was inconvenient.

Today, the electronic digital scale is still in use. It is accurate, reliable, and convenient to use.
 

LBAhunter

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Jan 2, 2018
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I got Lyman 1200 DPS 2, that I got when they first came out. I never had a problem until a couple of months ago. It started cutting off and on. I called Lyman. She asked how long I had it. I said it been a while. I asked her when they first came. I think she said 18 years (or either 15), then I said 18 years (or either 15). She offered me a new one at 50% off.
 

Zonie

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I use a Ohaus 505 mechanical scale but that said, I only use it when I'm loading cartridges with smokeless powder.

Generally speaking, all of the black powders and synthetic black powders aren't that sensitive to slight changes in the amount of powder that is loaded.
Where something even as small as 1/10 of a grain of smokeless powder can make a big difference in the pressure that a load will produce, even a difference of 1 or 2 grains of black or synthetic black powder won't make much of a difference. That's why a simple volumetric powder measure can used to load powder with and the variations in where the shot hits on the target or animal won't be noticeable. (OK. Maybe 2 grains of difference will show up on a target but for the most part, unless your into competitive target shooting, it isn't enough to worry about.)

I guess the bottom line IMO is, for most muzzleloading shooting with black or synthetic black powder, a precision powder scale isn't needed.
 

Idaholewis

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I use a Ohaus 505 mechanical scale but that said, I only use it when I'm loading cartridges with smokeless powder.

Generally speaking, all of the black powders and synthetic black powders aren't that sensitive to slight changes in the amount of powder that is loaded.
Where something even as small as 1/10 of a grain of smokeless powder can make a big difference in the pressure that a load will produce, even a difference of 1 or 2 grains of black or synthetic black powder won't make much of a difference. That's why a simple volumetric powder measure can used to load powder with and the variations in where the shot hits on the target or animal won't be noticeable. (OK. Maybe 2 grains of difference will show up on a target but for the most part, unless your into competitive target shooting, it isn't enough to worry about.)

I guess the bottom line IMO is, for most muzzleloading shooting with black or synthetic black powder, a precision powder scale isn't needed.
The Truth is, I can’t tell you if i can see a difference or not? I have never Tested the difference on Paper Between Weighed in Grains, and Volume Measured?

I like to shoot Long Range for Fun. Accuracy is EVERYTHING to me in this Hobby, i bench/target shoot more than anything, I STRIVE to Put Bullet inside of Bullet Hole, be it 100 Yards or 1,000 Yards. I do whatever i feel will get the ABSOLUTE Most out of my Rifles. That being said, i weigh my Powder charges in Grains, it has ALWAYS made the Best sense to me. This is Something i carried over from Reloading Precision Centerfire for over 30 Years. I have tested Volume measuring in Grain conversion LOTS of times, i have had Volume Be REALLY close a few times, and then be off 3-4 Grains another, I Simply Don’t trust Volume for Accuracy. I shoot Swiss Real Blackpowder, I believe the 3-4 Grains of Difference i have seen MANY times would Show over a Chronograph, how could it not? I Pre Weighing my Charges in Grains to the 1/10 is not only MUCH more Precise, i find it MUCH easier, When i get to the Field I don’t have to Mess with Weighing my Charges, they are already Done.

This is how i look at it. Would i trust my Precision Centerfire Rifle Handloads to “Close Enough” for Field use? ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! Why would i do so with my Muzzleloaders? After all, I am expecting the SAME TIP TOP Performance out of them as i am my Centerfire Rifles, Why would i Cut corners with my Muzzleloaders?
 

Idaholewis

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In short, I expect a LOT from my Rifles, I give them EVERY POSSIBLE Chance to Perform at their VERY BEST. I feel that being More Precise with my Powder Charges than “Close Enough” For field use is the LEAST i can do for my Rifles.

Get this, i also weigh EVERY SINGLE Bullet i cast, and ONLY keep the ones that are Plus/Minus 1 Grain, With PERFECT Bullet Bases. ;)

 
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Ninering62

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Aug 20, 2019
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We'll stated! I couldn't agree more.
The Truth is, I can’t tell you if i can see a difference or not? I have never Tested the difference on Paper Between Weighed in Grains, and Volume Measured?

I like to shoot Long Range for Fun. Accuracy is EVERYTHING to me in this Hobby, i bench/target shoot more than anything, I STRIVE to Put Bullet inside of Bullet Hole, be it 100 Yards or 1,000 Yards. I do whatever i feel will get the ABSOLUTE Most out of my Rifles. That being said, i weigh my Powder charges in Grains, it has ALWAYS made the Best sense to me. This is Something i carried over from Reloading Precision Centerfire for over 30 Years. I have tested Volume measuring in Grain conversion LOTS of times, i have had Volume Be REALLY close a few times, and then be off 3-4 Grains another, I Simply Don’t trust Volume for Accuracy. I shoot Swiss Real Blackpowder, I believe the 3-4 Grains of Difference i have seen MANY times would Show over a Chronograph, how could it not? I Pre Weighing my Charges in Grains to the 1/10 is not only MUCH more Precise, i find it MUCH easier, When i get to the Field I don’t have to Mess with Weighing my Charges, they are already Done.

This is how i look at it. Would i trust my Precision Centerfire Rifle Handloads to “Close Enough” for Field use? ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! Why would i do so with my Muzzleloaders? After all, I am expecting the SAME TIP TOP Performance out of them as i am my Centerfire Rifles, Why would i Cut corners with my Muzzleloaders?
stated
 

MrTom

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Dec 7, 2016
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In short, I expect a LOT from my Rifles, I give them EVERY POSSIBLE Chance to Perform at their VERY BEST. I feel that being More Precise with my Powder Charges than “Close Enough” For field use is the LEAST i can do for my Rifles.

Get this, i also weigh EVERY SINGLE Bullet i cast, and ONLY keep the ones that are Plus/Minus 1 Grain, With PERFECT Bullet Bases.
I weigh my 209 charges just because I want to remove any deviation in the powder charges from the over-all shooting equation. One less thing to worry about. While I do not tinker with the cast lead bullets, I do buy bulk XTPs and Barnes bullets. I do not weigh these bullets but I do check each and every one for any scar or dent or malformed tip that might be in the box. Those that I question go in one pile for casual shooting. The best go in a covered plastic bullet case designed for .45 auto for pistol rounds and they get covered with some soft foam padding. These are used for my hunting and final shooting in of the hunting gun using them. I check all my sabots too. Any sabot that has a chink in the seal end of it or a broken or mal-shaped petal goes in the junk basket.

I often wonder if the occasional flyer that happens in the middle of an otherwise decent string of shots hasn't come from a deformed bullet that I missed while plucking them from a bulk box. When I loaded for center fire rounds I always sorted the bullets and of course always weighed the powder charges and just never quite got away from the habit doing so with the muzzies once I started in with in-line guns. I know it may sound petty in the whole scheme of things but taking time to do these things is something I enjoy doing in free time and when I sit down to shoot for a couple hours things just seem to go along so much smoother knowing I have eliminated at least three areas of concern. When I am shooting I want things right.
 

Sideshow

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Oct 14, 2019
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In short, I expect a LOT from my Rifles, I give them EVERY POSSIBLE Chance to Perform at their VERY BEST. I feel that being More Precise with my Powder Charges than “Close Enough” For field use is the LEAST i can do for my Rifles.

Get this, i also weigh EVERY SINGLE Bullet i cast, and ONLY keep the ones that are Plus/Minus 1 Grain, With PERFECT Bullet Bases. ;)

AMEN !!!!!!!! To me the paper feels NOTHING !!!!!!!! Animals , wild and free , can.and DO !!!!!!! Its a PRIVILEDGE to hunt them . I have a RESPONSIBILITY from On High to take them cleanly with the utmost precision !!! Paper CANNOT compare to this !!!!!!! Unfortuneatly this view seems to have taken 2nd place behind our own motives . I practice and test foremost for that reason and outcome . They are litterly the same to me . Good job ldaholewis !!!!!!
 

Rockman

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Nov 23, 2019
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How's the old saying go- 'close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades'. Some of the replies here have emphasized accuracy for one of the reasons to get a scale. Being rather new to this sport, establishing accuracy with loads seems like sound advice to me. That's what helped me decide to get a scale. Thanks for all the replies.
 
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