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Easy camp food fixins

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GM54-120

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Not all of us have a fridge at camp and limited cooler space but there are TONS of items you can buy that dont need special storage requirements. Even canned food can freeze then swell the can if you hunt in cooler climates. The other day at Costco i found this. It was almost $10 for 3lbs of meat in broth. No other seasonings than a little salt. The sodium is also low. Should work well for some camp tacos or BBQ beef sammies :D
 
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GM54-120

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Sorry, decided to move it here even though its not "wild game".
 

GM54-120

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Other things i get and even use at home.

Dried potato. Very common item at any Latino market that has Peruvian food. They are called Papas Seca or Papas Seca Amarillo. They are stupid expensive on Amazon but cheap at good Latino markets.
Tomato Powder. Fairly cheap on Amazon. You can even make your own ketchup with it if you got vinegar.
Diced Dried Veggies. Sometimes cheap on Amazon.
Cream Powder, Yeah really. Anthony Foods brand on Amazon. Works well for recipes that call for dairy. Taste better than Carnation milk powder too.
Cheddar Cheese Powder. Either Anthony or Hoosier Hills on Amazon. Very tasty on popcorn too.
Dried beans. Sure they are way more work than canned but they can be so much better too. It aint that hard to boil some water.

Hoosier Hill on Amazon

Anthony on Amazon
 

MrTom

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Ha! I just picked up 100 pint sized and 50 quart sized vacuum sealer bags. I chill soups and pasta with sauce and the bags until they are very cold in the freezer, then add to the bags and freeze. Before vacuum sealing I wipe any ice crystals out of the mouth of the bags then vacuum seal. While frozen they can go right into a pot of boiling water to make an instant meal.
 

GM54-120

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Back in the old days dried meat was a welcome addition to a camp cooks pantry. Still a common staple in some SA countries like Brazil. They add it to a black bean stew called feijoada along with pork. Dried beef today super expensive. I actually like the dried potatoes a lot. Nice texture and hassle free.

Something unusual to add to beens is dried shredded pork. Its common at Asian markets. One of my Costcos started carrying it too. A good size jar is about $10 and way cheaper than the Asian markets. The Chinese add it to a rice porridge. I thought it was great in beans too. Just use it as a "topper". No need to cook it into the beans unless you want.
 

dirtsailor2003

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Having been avid backpackers we always have freeze dried food in our camp provisions. Been hard to find locally since the virus hit. Couple pantry items we always have are instant rice, sure is taters, dried soups. All quick and just require boiled water.

Like Mr Tom we vacuum pack lots of things. I like to make things we can reheat by boiling in the bag. Here’s a few things we do.
Pasta dishes, cooked rice, chili, stew, casseroles, pot pies.

For breakfast I’ll crack two eggs into a vacuum bag. Add diced peppers, pre cooked ham, bacon, or other meat, cheese. Then seal the bag. you can freeze this or put in cooler fresh. Plop in boiling water and you have an omelette in a bag. If your cooler is good they’ll keep up to 7 days. Just a tip if you’re taking eggs cracking them into bags (vacuum or hood quality

Our coolers can keep food for 7-8 days. Any meats we take are vacuum packed and we put in frozen to help keep things cool.

Last weekend we camped and it rained I spent a good amount of time sitting by my mini wood stove enjoying freeze dried food!
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edmehlig

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Never thought of cracked eggs, peppers etc in a vacuum seal bag and boiling them for later. :lewis:
 

GM54-120

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Been hard to find locally since the virus hit.
Tell me about it. I actually like dried potatoes. Like the kind in boxes of Betty Crocker Au Gratin. Trying to get them now cost a fortune because small 1lbers are well over $10 and 20lb bulk boxes are over $60 by the time you pay for shipping. 8lb prepper pails are just ridiculous.

My wife would see the word "imported" and that would be it.....
I guess she only gets domestic produced olive oil then and not a good Italian/Greek/Spanish import. No Japanese grown Koshihikari rice either? She would rather have US grown with higher traces of arsenic?

Oddly some countries have food standards higher than our own and Brazil has a VERY large beef industry. In 2018 they exported more than we did. They were the #1 exporter.
 

GM54-120

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If you have a large Latino or international market look for these. They are about $3/14oz bag at mine. Works fantastic in stews. First you rehydrate in hot water for a hour then add them to the stew.

Belmont Papa Seca Amarilla

SWEET, our market had this brand before but i grabbed the Belmonts. Amazon has them for the same price as my market so i just ordered 2-3packs for $9 each.
 
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