Cleaning a Sidelock

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sdporter

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Sep 19, 2017
Messages
928
Has anyone ever used air tool lube for nail guns? I wonder if that would work. The only reason I ask is cause I have so much of it. I just dont see any reason it wouldn't work really good. Kind of shy to try it though. I used it one time but cleaned it out the next day. Seemd to work and is made to not let insides of nail guns rust.
I’ve used almost every kind of oil imaginable in the bore and on the barrel. More than likely just a 30 weight oil. Use it up I say..
 
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Bruce Mattes

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Feb 15, 2020
Messages
644
These little Hand Held Steam Cleaners are worth their Weight in Gold, At least in my Cleaning Routine :lewis: I can’t imagine not owning one, And at 30 Bucks or So they Don’t break the Bank to Own

They even work on them Ole Out-Lines, i mean inlines 😁

I went ahead last night and ordered one of these from Amazon, along with some other items that I will need to set myself up to shoot the Optima V2 pistol when it arrives back in my hands.

Dr. Purifier Steam Cleaner, 10-in-one
Accusize 0.011"-0.06" pin gage set
Accusize plus/minus pin gage vise
General Tool 93 0.04"-0.25" pin vise
Permatex 80632 thread sealant, 4 oz.
Frankford Arsenal DS-750 scale

Thank you Idaholewis, for so much helpful information, so freely given!!!!!
 

Idaholewis

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Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
5,235
Hey Lewis...Got a link to that steamer?
I don’t Hal, I got this one on Ebay, It was brand new with a “Make Offer” I made a LOW BALL offer and got it Cheap :lewis: This one i have is Called a “Scunci SS 1000” They made a 900 as well, But the 1000 is the More popular unit. I see these particular models (Scunci brand) at UNREAL Prices Compared to others? I THINK the reason for that, is these units were the First “as seen on TV Deals” and Folks selling them are Asking a Fortune due to Novelty? Nothing else makes sense why this Particular Model would Have such ridiculous price tags? I Bet ALL of these little Hand Held Steam Cleaners are made in the Same Chinese Sweat Shop?

I did wear one of these out, actually it was the Trigger that Quit working, it got “Spongy” it Started leaking and quit. It was Orange, and Called a Gideon, This is how i ended up with the Current Model i have. My dad was Given one of these Scunci SS 1000s, I liked it MUCH Better than the one i had that Quit, So i started searching for one like it

As much as i use mine, if/when it fails, I am gonna buy a Bigger Unit, Something i can do my Gun stuff with in a SNAP, And Also BIG Jobs, Such as an entire Floor. The Model I REALLY like the looks of, and have Studied some on, is this McCulloch MC1275 Heavy Duty Handheld Canister Steam Cleaner, This is a SERIOUS Rig :lewis: The Little Hand held units do AWESOME for Muzzleloader Stuff, But as you can imagine for their Little Size, they have to Cycle On/Off a LOT if you use them very Hard, About 30-45 Seconds of FULL Steam and these little Units need to Recover, They do so VERY quickly Though!

This Thing wouldn’t even know it had done a Muzzleloader Barrel :) I bet it wouldn’t even Cycle on a Barrel?
 

Sideshow

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Joined
Oct 14, 2019
Messages
2,010
I went ahead last night and ordered one of these from Amazon, along with some other items that I will need to set myself up to shoot the Optima V2 pistol when it arrives back in my hands.

Dr. Purifier Steam Cleaner, 10-in-one
Accusize 0.011"-0.06" pin gage set
Accusize plus/minus pin gage vise
General Tool 93 0.04"-0.25" pin vise
Permatex 80632 thread sealant, 4 oz.
Frankford Arsenal DS-750 scale

Thank you Idaholewis, for so much helpful information, so freely given!!!!!
Smart move on the Permatex #80632 !!! Theres NOTHING better !!!
 

Squint

Squint
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Joined
Feb 4, 2020
Messages
43
Another Example to Show you All how Clean a Barrel is NOT (The Fire Channe/Patented Breech that is)

I did this for Educational purposes, After Shooting my Rifle today, and THOROUGHLY Cleaning it in my Bucket Of Water (Pull Water up, And RAPIDLY Push it Back out, Back n Forth) A little Dish Soap on a Nylon Bore Brush, REALLY tight Patches, I had the BORE CLEAN, Pulling COTTON WHITE Patches in no time :lewis:

I pulled the CLEAN barrel from the Water and IMMEDIATELY went through the Nipple with my Little Steam Cleaner, THEN i ran another Couple of Clean/Dry Patches through To show you ALL This. Not very Clean anymore Huh?


Where is that CRUD coming From you might ask? From a Barrel that is Supposed to be Clean, SPOTLESS Clean Right? It’s coming from Here, the Fire Channel and Patented Breech. I don’t care what you do, you can NOT get these areas Clean in a Bucket of Water the “Old Traditional“ Way. NOT GONNA HAPPEN!!
I was quite impressed with the pictures of which you got with that steamer after cleaning your muzzleloader in the regular way. Like all muzzleloading shooters, I love to experiment.
There was a product that I used for several years called Brakleen. It's good for cleaning brake parts when you're working on automotive brakes. As a mechanic, we found lots of uses for it, as it dries quickly, nonflammable, and doesn't leave a film. Of course that perked my curiosity to know if it would clean that part of a muzzleloader that doesn't get cleaned, so I shot this morning, came home and cleaned the regular way with pumping hot water through the bore. I use 777 powder so there's not much in there. When I ran a dry patch, it came out clean. I then took a can of spray Brakleen and sprayed, with the nipple out, into the cavity and the route into the bore.. Returning to my bench I ran another dry patch in, and it came out looking just like yours, almost exactly. It was all brown and definitely dirty. Anyway I ran a number 13 patch down and it came out a little bad and then a couple of dry patches came out clean. I'm not trying to say that this is as good as what you are doing with the steamer, but it is something that I decided I could use at the range, especially if I wasn't going right home or when I'm out hunting. It might not be that bad in a pinch as it evaporates so fast that it reminds you of ether. The main ingredient is a compound called, tetracloroethylene. I don't think you would want to get it on a gunstock as I'm sure it would pull the finish.
Squint
 

sdporter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
928
I was quite impressed with the pictures of which you got with that steamer after cleaning your muzzleloader in the regular way. Like all muzzleloading shooters, I love to experiment.
There was a product that I used for several years called Brakleen. It's good for cleaning brake parts when you're working on automotive brakes. As a mechanic, we found lots of uses for it, as it dries quickly, nonflammable, and doesn't leave a film. Of course that perked my curiosity to know if it would clean that part of a muzzleloader that doesn't get cleaned, so I shot this morning, came home and cleaned the regular way with pumping hot water through the bore. I use 777 powder so there's not much in there. When I ran a dry patch, it came out clean. I then took a can of spray Brakleen and sprayed, with the nipple out, into the cavity and the route into the bore.. Returning to my bench I ran another dry patch in, and it came out looking just like yours, almost exactly. It was all brown and definitely dirty. Anyway I ran a number 13 patch down and it came out a little bad and then a couple of dry patches came out clean. I'm not trying to say that this is as good as what you are doing with the steamer, but it is something that I decided I could use at the range, especially if I wasn't going right home or when I'm out hunting. It might not be that bad in a pinch as it evaporates so fast that it reminds you of ether. The main ingredient is a compound called, tetracloroethylene. I don't think you would want to get it on a gunstock as I'm sure it would pull the finish.
Squint
I use it on Leaking air conditioners to clean off all the oil before and after a repair. Also to remove oil from bullet moulds after I pull em outta the lathe.
 

Bruce Mattes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
644
I was quite impressed with the pictures of which you got with that steamer after cleaning your muzzleloader in the regular way. Like all muzzleloading shooters, I love to experiment.
There was a product that I used for several years called Brakleen. It's good for cleaning brake parts when you're working on automotive brakes. As a mechanic, we found lots of uses for it, as it dries quickly, nonflammable, and doesn't leave a film. Of course that perked my curiosity to know if it would clean that part of a muzzleloader that doesn't get cleaned, so I shot this morning, came home and cleaned the regular way with pumping hot water through the bore. I use 777 powder so there's not much in there. When I ran a dry patch, it came out clean. I then took a can of spray Brakleen and sprayed, with the nipple out, into the cavity and the route into the bore.. Returning to my bench I ran another dry patch in, and it came out looking just like yours, almost exactly. It was all brown and definitely dirty. Anyway I ran a number 13 patch down and it came out a little bad and then a couple of dry patches came out clean. I'm not trying to say that this is as good as what you are doing with the steamer, but it is something that I decided I could use at the range, especially if I wasn't going right home or when I'm out hunting. It might not be that bad in a pinch as it evaporates so fast that it reminds you of ether. The main ingredient is a compound called, tetracloroethylene. I don't think you would want to get it on a gunstock as I'm sure it would pull the finish.
Squint
I don't know if tetrachloroethylene is as toxic as the trichloroethylene we used in the machine shop to degrease parts. If it is then you should limit exposure on your skin, and take care not to inhale any more than is necessary.
 

deermanok

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Jan 29, 2020
Messages
469
I find the steam cleaning method very interesting. I've always taken my barrels off and used the hot soapy water, sorta plunger technique with a cleaning rod and patch. From what I've been reading here, you don't have to spend a lot of money on a portable steam cleaner. Gonna have to look into one.
 

Idaholewis

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Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
5,235
I find the steam cleaning method very interesting. I've always taken my barrels off and used the hot soapy water, sorta plunger technique with a cleaning rod and patch. From what I've been reading here, you don't have to spend a lot of money on a portable steam cleaner. Gonna have to look into one.
I got the Steam Cleaning idea back in my Beginning in Muzzleloading, The idea came from the HIGH Dollar Pedersoli Unit. I had a BACO Catalog and kept running in to this Pedersoli Steam Cleaner, I was impressed with the idea, But i wasn’t about to Pay the OUTLANDISH Price for the Pedersoli Unit. A Friend of mine mentioned that I should go on Amazon and Buy a Cheap Steam Cleaner there, After All STEAM is STEAM The Pedersoli is just a Fancy Stainless unit, and Their Name

Here is the Pedersoli Unit in Action, Where the Idea Came from

 

Ninering62

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Joined
Aug 20, 2019
Messages
560
I luv Brakleen!
Me bein an old school harley guy & shade tree mech on classic muscle cars & all kinds of other stuff from lawnmowers, chainsaws to the tractor ( which I have to go replace a bucket ram hydraulic seal today ) So I too luv brakleen & always have a few cans on hand & crc 556 industrial grade penetrating oil ( way better than wd40).
 

Squint

Squint
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Joined
Feb 4, 2020
Messages
43
Not to get too far off subject, but as a hobby welder I happened upon this article re the dangers of using breakclean with regard to cleaning metal prior to welding. It may or may
not be applicable here, but I think this is really good to know info.
Safety Alert! Brake Cleaner = Phosgene Gas
[/QUOTE]
thank you for posting that, it is a very interesting safety alert. I've used it on stuff for years, not in large amounts, a little goes a long ways, but I wasn't aware of that danger, but that's why I posted what the ingredient was. I've noticed that it evaporates at a pretty fast clip and I have tried to do most of my spraying in the open air, but I have never noticed any thing bad using a small amount in my shop. I wouldn't be surprised that others spray cleaners such as electric cleaner or even electronic cleaner would to do the same thing that brakeleen does, especially for what I was using it for. Most any of these products like this are not good for eyes and are probably not good for Lungs either, but I'm sure many mechanics use some of them indoors with doors shut. I used starting fluid many times to clean hydraulic fittings, but a person needs to be aware that it is very flammable. I never tried it to clean in-place of the other compounds because of the flammable mixture. Strangely, welding was a large part of my employment for many years, I just never had occasion to use any of these sprays like that fellow did in that safety alert.
Squint
 

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